My name is Ashley McLaughlin and this is my blog, Edible Perspective. To learn more about my journey head on over to my about + FAQ pages. I'm thrilled that you stopped by. Enjoy!

 

 


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Baked Doughnuts For Everyone: From Sweet to Savory to Everything in Between, 101 Delicious Recipes, All Gluten-Free

 

Thursday
Sep182014

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones

I’m absolutely in love with the jewel tone colors of figs.

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones | edibleperspective.com

I could stare at them all day long. Or at least for 10 solid minutes. They’re so tiny but chubby and that short stem! Yes, I have a fig-crush.

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones | edibleperspective.com

Let’s move on from figs to life. My brain feels all sorts of scattered lately. Please tell me it’s not just me. Maybe it’s the seasons changing. I mean, last week there was frost on the ground and this week it’s 90 degrees. Gotta’ love fall in Colorado. But really. I’m trying to avoid talking about being “SO BUSY,” but what do you say when you’re so freaking busy? How about, “I have a legit amount of commitments.”? Yeah, we’ll go with that. 

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones | edibleperspective.com

It’s a good thing, though, having a steady stream of work + life happenings. Trust me, I am over-the-top excited about the work that has come my way this past year. I’m absolutely loving it, and I’ll tell you more about it soon. But working for yourself is no joke. It’s a one [wo]man show over here. I think I missed the training day on, “How to become the boss and owner and employee and planner and do everything-er.” I’m sure many of you can relate, even if you do work for someone else.

So far I’ve learned it’s a slow + steady process with more growing pains than I ever imagined. And during these growing pains my dad tells me this is when I’m really learning about myself. Learning what excites me, what terrifies me, what gives me anxiety, what motivates me, etc. The growing pains can really suck, but my dad makes a good point. If I wasn’t testing myself this much maybe I wouldn’t be learning as much about myself? Dads and their wisdom.

This scattered brain feeling is all part of the learning process. It’s normal, and I need to remember that. And I’m hoping this legit amount of commitments keeps up so I can continue to hone my “do everything-er” skills. One day I’ll have it down to a science. But until then, let’s eat figgy scones.

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones | edibleperspective.com

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones | edibleperspective.com

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones | edibleperspective.com

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones | edibleperspective.com

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones | edibleperspective.com

Print this!

adapted from my lemon poppy seed scones

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones gluten-free, refined sugar free // yields 16 petite scones

scones:

  • 1 1/2 cups gluten-free oat flour
  • 3/4 cup sweet rice flour
  • 1/2 cup almond meal, or almond flour
  • 1 tablespoon baking powder
  • 1/3 cup coconut sugar, or muscovado, sucanat, or pure cane sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 7 tablespoons cold butter, chopped
  • 1/3 cup low-fat buttermilk
  • 1 large egg
  • 2 large egg yolks
  • 2 teaspoons pure vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon scraped vanilla beans, from about 2 vanilla bean pods
  • 3/4 cup 1/4-inch chopped fresh figs, stems removed

glaze:

  • 1/2 cup powdered coconut sugar, directions in notes 
  • 2-3 tablespoons 1/2 & 1/2 cream
  • 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

In a large bowl, stir together all dry ingredients until well combined. Add butter to the dry mixture and cut in with a pastry cutter or large fork until the mixture is crumbly and butter is evenly distributed. You want pebble-sized pieces of butter to remain in the mixture. Place bowl in the fridge.

In a medium bowl, whisk together all wet ingredients until thoroughly combined. Line 1-2 baking sheets with parchment paper. Set aside.

Remove the dry bowl from the fridge and pour the wet mixture into the dry. Gently stir with a large spoon until the liquid is just incorporated [the dough will not hold together at this point].

Finish mixing with one of your hands while lightly kneading it in the bowl until there is no dry flour in the bottom of the bowl. Knead once or twice more until held together but do not work into a tightly packed ball. The dough should not be too sticky, but very thick and heavy. It will stick to your fingers some. If overly sticky, add another 1 to 3 tablespoons of oat flour. Avoid over-kneading /mixing.

Split the dough in 2 halves, shape into rough ball-shapes, and place on the large baking sheet. Lightly work the dough into a circular shape with your fingertips until about 1/2-inch thickness all around. Lightly press in the edges to help them hold together. The dough will look shaggy and rough around the edges.

Repeat with second dough and then slice each circle into 8 petite scones. Preheat your oven to 425° F with a rack in the center position. Place the pan of scones in the freezer for 10 minutes while preheating.

Remove pan from the freezer and carefully separate the scones with a large metal spatula [re-slicing if needed]. Spread scones on the pan leaving 1 to 2 inches between each.

Bake for 12 to 15 minutes until the tops have risen and are cracked, and the bottom edges are golden brown. Let cool for 30 minutes then move to a cooling rack and allow to fully cool.

To make the glaze: Whisk together powdered sugar, 1/2 & 1/2, and vanilla extract. Add more cream to thin out if needed. Drizzle or spread over cooled scones and let rest for about 2 hours before serving. The texture is best a few hours out of the oven.

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Notes: I do not recommend making any substitutions or adjusting ingredient amounts in this recipe. Sweet rice flour can be found in many natural food stores but it can always be found [and for less money] at Asian supermarkets [also known as “glutinous rice flour”].

To make powdered coconut sugar: Place 1 cup coconut sugar [sucanat or pure cane sugar] in a blender with 1 tablespoon arrowroot starch [or cornstarch]. Turn on and blend until smooth like powdered sugar. Store excess in a sealed jar in a pantry.

Vanilla Bean Fig Scones | edibleperspective.com

Happy Friday, friends!

Ashley

p.s. The winner of Jessica’s cookbook, Seriously Delish is: Erika, who said, “Ahhhh so excited!!! Last insane thing I ate: probably the cake tasting at my birthday. Five different cakes (brought by my siblings)...chocolate on chocolate on ice cream on carrot on whipped cream on meringue on lemon. Altogether, so truly, insanely decadent. Thanks for doing the giveaway!”

Thanks for all who entered!!

Monday
Sep152014

Food Photography Tip of the Week |23|

Food Photography Tip of the Week |23|

Stocking your prop collection without breaking the bank!

Today I’m over on Craftsy talking all about basic food photography props, where to find them, and how to build up your collection on the cheap. I rarely spend more than a few dollars on one single prop, and I always scope out the new magazines for Crate + Barrel, West Elm, C+B, etc. and then wait until the end of the season when all of the dishware and bowls are a few bucks off. Thrifting + antiquing has also become a regular activity to find fun and unique pieces, like those awesome beat up baking sheets that create a dark + moody feel.

To learn more about my collection and read some tips on prop shopping check out this post!

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Ashley